Archive | October, 2013

Recover files from a dead external drive

31 Oct

Xolelwa Mzili’s PC no longer sees her external hard drive. Can she recover the files?

Because they’re used heavily for backup and sneakernet, we tend to assume that every file on an external hard drive also exists elsewhere. But if a file is only on the external drive, it is not backed up and can be lost.

So if you keep any files exclusively on an external hard drive, you need a backup of that drive.

But enough of the lecture. Let’s see if you can get your files back. It all depends on how badly the drive is damaged, and how much money you’re willing to spend to restore it.

[Email your tech questions to answer@pcworld.com.]

First of all, is the drive making a clicking or scraping noise that it never made before? If so, you’ll have to send it to a recovery service. More on that below.

If there are no suspicious noises, the problem could be with your PC. Try another USB port. If none of your USB ports work, try another computer.

Still can’t get at those files? It’s time to take a hard look at that drive. Open up an external hard drive, and you’ll find an internal hard drive inside. If you can figure out how to open the enclosure, you might find a lose connection that’s easily fixed. Or you can remove the internal drive and connect that to your computer, either by installing it as a second drive inside a desktop PC, or by using a SATA-USB adapter or enclosure. These are available for about $20.

If these solutions don’t work, the problem is with the drive. Your only option, again, is to send it to a data recovery service, such as DriveSavers and Ontrack. Those are the best known, but I can’t say that they’re any better than lesser-known, possibly less-expensive services. I’ve never had to use one myself, and there’s no practical method for thoroughly testing data retrieval companies.

Even with the best of these services, there’s no guarantee you’ll get your files back. Your drive may be too damaged. If they successfully retrieve your files, expect to pay hundreds of dollars, and maybe more than a thousand.

Now don’t you wish you had backed up that drive?

Lincoln Spector Contributing Editor, PCWorld

When he isn’t bicycling, prowling used bookstores, or watching movies, PC World Contributing Editor Lincoln Spector writes about technology and cinema.
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Source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2054420/recover-files-from-a-dead-external-drive.html#tk.rss_all
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The roundup: Nexus 5 leaks all over the place ahead of anticipated launch

31 Oct

Nexus 5

It's coming; here's a last-minute look at everywhere the Nexus 5 has cropped up in the past 24 hours

In case you hadn't been paying attention, there's a new Nexus phone due to arrive very soon, and this week has seen the LG-made device make its way out to all corners of the world ahead of its anticipated release. There's evidence that devices are already in the hands of carrier and retailer reps, so naturally this has led to an acceleration in the pace of online leaks. Join us after the break for a rundown of some newly-unearthed images of this still unannounced handset.

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Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/androidcentral/~3/pBnFTUi-Er0/story01.htm
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Barnes & Noble’s Nook GlowLight is lighter, brighter, whiter, with less Simple Touch for $119

30 Oct

DNP Barnes & Noble's Nook GlowLight is lighter, brighter, whiter, with less Simple Touch for $119

As a ketchup bottle once famously said: Good things take time (we’re paraphrasing here, of course). Roughly a year and a half ago, Barnes and Noble made its top-notch Nook Simple Touch even better, with the addition of GlowLight. Before the end of the year, however, the company had been outdone by both Kobo and Amazon in that department; the two e-reader competitors launched devices with more uniform and brighter front-lighting technologies. Since then, those companies have both offered up refreshes, Amazon with a new Paperwhite and Kobo with the slick Aura, leaving us wondering why Barnes & Noble had been quiet for so long. Surely issues with its hardware division couldn’t be helping matters.

Today, however, things are looking, um, brighter for the company. The latest Nook is available now through Barnes & Noble’s site, bringing with it a slew of upgrades and a shortened name. Say “goodbye” to Simple Touch. This time out, it’s just Nook GlowLight, a new name for a new look. Gone is the matte black color scheme of its predecessor (not to mention most of the rest of the industry); the company has traded that in for a white design that evokes the Nook HD tablet. It’s also easier on the eyes, according to the company, with less of a contrast between the bezel and display. It’s still a sizable bezel, of course. B&N didn’t shave things down like the Kobo. There’s also a rubber bumper running around the perimeter. The company won’t actually call it “rugged,” but we suspect that’ll help it take a tumble a bit more gracefully.

Barnes & Noble’s Nook GlowLight is lighter, brighter, whiter, with less Simple Touch for $119

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Gone, sadly, are the physical page-turn buttons Barnes & Noble held onto for so long. And while the touchscreen is plenty responsive, we did always appreciate the option. Also ditched this time out is the concave back we liked on the Simple Touch models. We’re told that the company no longer found it necessary in order to provide the most ergonomic experience, though we suspect it just jumped at the opportunity to make the device a bit thinner overall. That said, the reader’s a pleasure to hold, thanks in no small part to its light weight. The GlowLight is a mere 6.2 ounces — 15 percent lighter than the new Paperwhite, as the company happily points out. And indeed, it’s an impressive reduction, bringing the heft down to around that of a pocket paperback.

DNP Barnes & Noble's Nook GlowLight is lighter, brighter, whiter, with less Simple Touch for $119

The power button has been moved to the side, presumably to eliminate accidental triggers, though we watched as a rep put the cover on the reader and found him accidentally turning it on several times. The “n” button is still intact, thankfully, and used for both returning home and turning on the front light, which is accomplished when you hold it down for a few seconds. As for the GlowLight technology itself, the company’s really upped the ante over the last gen, bringing it on par with the competition. Gone is the blue-tinged and spotty coverage of the first model. You can still see the origin of the lights up top, if you tilt it right, but, well, you have to tilt it to actually see them.

DNP Barnes & Noble's Nook GlowLight is lighter, brighter, whiter, with less Simple Touch for $119

Like with the Aura, E Ink has managed to reduce full-page refreshes here, so there’s no flash on the display every six pages or so while reading. Barnes & Noble says it’s also done away with text ghosting, and indeed, we didn’t see any during our demo. There’s no expandable storage, though the on-board amount has been doubled to 4GB (also double that of the Paperwhite). The UI and store, meanwhile, have been simplified to the essentials — probably the best for an e-reader. All of that is available today through Barnes & Noble’s site for $119. The cover, meanwhile, will run you $22. It doesn’t add to the reader’s bulk, but it also doesn’t close exactly, thanks to an absence of magnets. Life is full of trade-offs.

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/10/30/nook-glowlight/?ncid=rss_truncated
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Identifying the signs of autism earlier

29 Oct

Identifying the signs of autism earlier

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

29-Oct-2013

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Contact: Susan Stevens Martin
ssmartin@aap.org
847-434-7131
American Academy of Pediatrics

Subtle warning signs may warrant referral to a developmental specialist before age 18 months

ORLANDO, Fla. How early can you diagnose autism? The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends screening children beginning at 18 months, but research suggests subtle warning signs may be apparent even earlier, according to Patricia Manning-Courtney, MD, FAAP, who delivered a plenary address at 11:10 a.m. ET Tuesday, Oct. 29, at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in Orlando.

In her presentation, “Early Screening and Diagnosis in Autism Spectrum Disorders: How Low Can we Go,” Dr. Manning-Courtney described studies of siblings of children with autism that helped detect very subtle behaviors that may surface before age 18 months. The earlier a child is diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, the earlier critical behavioral and learning interventions can begin.

At age six months, it is very difficult to distinguish kids with autism and kids without autism, said Dr. Manning-Courtney, who is the director of the Kelly O’Leary Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. From age 12 to 18 months, there may be extremely subtle differences too subtle and infrequent to incorporate into diagnostic criteriain eye contact, visual tracking behavior and play. These children may have more limited and repetitive play, less name response and social smiling, babbling and gesture use.

Pediatricians are sensitive to how overburdened the resources are for children with autism, Dr. Manning-Courntey said, and do not want to further strain the system with an incorrect referral to a specialist. But children at high risk for autism, including siblings of children with autism, should have a lower threshold for concerning behaviors.

“If you have some of these bigger concerns you can and should refer these children,” Dr. Manning-Courtney said. A referral can be made to a developmental pediatrician or a multi-disciplinary diagnostic team that may include a neurologist, psychologist, or other health care professionals with expertise in diagnosing autism.

“I hope pediatricians leave with an understanding that they may be able to pick up on things in very young children, even further than that appearing on an MCHAT (Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers) or other screening tools,” said Dr. Manning-Courtney.

###

The American Academy of Pediatrics is an organization of 60,000 primary care pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical specialists dedicated to the health, safety and well being of infants, children, adolescents and young adults. For more information, visit http://www.aap.org.



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Identifying the signs of autism earlier

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

29-Oct-2013

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]


Share Share

Contact: Susan Stevens Martin
ssmartin@aap.org
847-434-7131
American Academy of Pediatrics

Subtle warning signs may warrant referral to a developmental specialist before age 18 months

ORLANDO, Fla. How early can you diagnose autism? The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends screening children beginning at 18 months, but research suggests subtle warning signs may be apparent even earlier, according to Patricia Manning-Courtney, MD, FAAP, who delivered a plenary address at 11:10 a.m. ET Tuesday, Oct. 29, at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in Orlando.

In her presentation, “Early Screening and Diagnosis in Autism Spectrum Disorders: How Low Can we Go,” Dr. Manning-Courtney described studies of siblings of children with autism that helped detect very subtle behaviors that may surface before age 18 months. The earlier a child is diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, the earlier critical behavioral and learning interventions can begin.

At age six months, it is very difficult to distinguish kids with autism and kids without autism, said Dr. Manning-Courtney, who is the director of the Kelly O’Leary Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. From age 12 to 18 months, there may be extremely subtle differences too subtle and infrequent to incorporate into diagnostic criteriain eye contact, visual tracking behavior and play. These children may have more limited and repetitive play, less name response and social smiling, babbling and gesture use.

Pediatricians are sensitive to how overburdened the resources are for children with autism, Dr. Manning-Courntey said, and do not want to further strain the system with an incorrect referral to a specialist. But children at high risk for autism, including siblings of children with autism, should have a lower threshold for concerning behaviors.

“If you have some of these bigger concerns you can and should refer these children,” Dr. Manning-Courtney said. A referral can be made to a developmental pediatrician or a multi-disciplinary diagnostic team that may include a neurologist, psychologist, or other health care professionals with expertise in diagnosing autism.

“I hope pediatricians leave with an understanding that they may be able to pick up on things in very young children, even further than that appearing on an MCHAT (Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers) or other screening tools,” said Dr. Manning-Courtney.

###

The American Academy of Pediatrics is an organization of 60,000 primary care pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical specialists dedicated to the health, safety and well being of infants, children, adolescents and young adults. For more information, visit http://www.aap.org.



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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-10/aaop-its101813.php
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Norway Says It Can’t Destroy Syria’s Chemical Weapons

28 Oct

A convoy of United Nations vehicles at the Lebanon-Syria Masnaa border crossing on October 1 as a chemical weapons disarmament team awaits entry into the country.

AFP/Getty Images

Norway has turned down a U.S. request to take on the destruction of Syria’s chemical weapons, saying it lacks the capabilities to carry out the task.

The country’s foreign ministry said it had given “serious and thorough consideration” to the U.S. request but that “due to time constraints and external factors, such as capacities, [and] regulatory requirements,” it would be unable to fulfill the request.

Foreign Minister Boerge Brende said his country didn’t have a port that could take the weapons and that Norway lacks the capacity to treat some of the waste products that would result from disarming the munitions.

Brende, speaking in a webcast, said Washington and Oslo had jointly concluded that “Norway is not the most suitable location for this destruction.”

As NPR’s Tom Bowman reported on Thursday, the issue of who will destroy the weapons has become a thorny one for the U.S. as it seeks to eliminate the chemical weapons threat in Syria.

Source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/10/25/240704798/norway-says-it-cant-destroy-syrias-chemical-weapons?ft=1&f=1004
Category: Dallas Latos   Government Shutdown 2013   Jordan Linn Graham  

FBI to investigate shooting of Calif. 13-year-old

27 Oct

This combination of photos provided by the family via The Press Democrat and the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Department shows an undated photo of 13-year-old Andy Lopez and the replica assault rifle he was holding when he was shot and killed by two Sonoma County deputies in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013. (AP Photo/Family via The Press Democrat, Sonoma County Sheriff’s Department)

This combination of photos provided by the family via The Press Democrat and the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Department shows an undated photo of 13-year-old Andy Lopez and the replica assault rifle he was holding when he was shot and killed by two Sonoma County deputies in Santa Rosa, Calif. on Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013. (AP Photo/Family via The Press Democrat, Sonoma County Sheriff’s Department)

(AP) — The Federal Bureau of Investigation is conducting an independent investigation of the fatal shooting of a popular 13-year-old boy by a sheriff’s deputy in Northern California.

Sonoma County Sheriff Steve Freitas said in a statement Friday afternoon that he will cooperate fully with federal investigators and welcomes their participation in the probe of Andy Lopez’s killing on Tuesday afternoon. The shooting has generated numerous protests and marches in the suburban town of Santa Rosa, with many residents questioning the deputy’s decision to fire on the youth.

Freitas also expressed sympathy to the Lopez family and thanked the Santa Rosa community for keeping protests peaceful.

Police say Lopez was carrying a pellet gun that looked like an AK-47 assault rifle.

A timeline released Thursday by the Santa Rosa police shows that only 10 seconds passed from the moment that the sheriff’s deputy and his partner called dispatch to report a suspicious person to the moment they called back to say shots had been fired.

FBI spokesman Paul Lee said he did not know why his agency decided to get involved or whether local authorities had requested its help.

More than 100 angry middle and high school students walked to City Hall on Friday, the Santa Rosa Press Democrat reported. Hundreds of people protested earlier in the week.

City police and the Sonoma County district attorney’s office are also investigating.

The Santa Rosa Police Department said two deputies in a squad car encountered the hoodie-wearing Lopez just after 3:14 p.m.

Witnesses say at least one of the deputies took cover behind an open front door of the cruiser, and one yelled twice “drop the gun.”

Ten seconds after their initial report to dispatch, one of the officers called in “shot have been fired.”

Sixteen seconds later, the deputies were calling for medical help. Lopez was later pronounced dead at the scene. The Sonoma County coroner said he found seven “apparent entry wounds,” two of them fatal.

The deputies, who have not been identified, have been placed on paid administrative leave, which is standard after a shooting, officials said.

Assistant Sheriff Lorenzo Duenas told the Press Democrat that the deputy who shot the teen is a 24-year veteran and his partner, who did not fire his weapon, is a new hire.

Santa Rosa police Lt. Paul Henry told the newspaper the deputy who opened fire later told investigators he believed his life as well his partner’s was in jeopardy. The deputy said the teen didn’t comply with commands to drop the gun and was turning toward the deputies while raising the barrel.

“The deputy’s mindset was that he was fearful that he was going to be shot,” Henry said at a Wednesday news conference.

Geoffrey Alpert, a professor of criminology at the University of South Carolina, said officers are typically justified in the use of deadly force when they sincerely believe lives are at stake.

If the teen was raising the barrel of the gun toward officers, they had little choice about firing, Alpert said.

“If it’s a pink bubble gum gun and an obvious fake to most, then there is no reason to shoot,” he said. “But if the gun looks real the barrel is being pointed at you … it’s unfortunate, but a perceived threat trumps age and the officers have to protect themselves.”

Hundreds of community members marched Wednesday night to remember the teen and protest the shooting.

They covered more than three miles from Santa Rosa City Hall to the field where Andy Lopez was killed. Some lit candles and placed flowers at a makeshift memorial with printed pictures of the victim, stuffed animals and a balloon that read “RIP Andy L.”

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/386c25518f464186bf7a2ac026580ce7/Article_2013-10-27-Deputies%20Shoot-13-Year-Old/id-86bce660c3bd44e1b871adedf8063c97
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Soft-spoken teen accused of killing Mass. teacher

26 Oct

DANVERS, Mass. (AP) — A well-liked teacher was found slain in woods behind this quiet Massachusetts town’s high school, and a 14-year-old boy who was found walking along a state highway overnight was charged with killing her.

Blood found in a second-floor school bathroom helped lead investigators to the body of Colleen Ritzer, a 24-year-old math teacher at Danvers High School who was reported missing when she didn’t come home from work on Tuesday, Essex District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett said.

“She was a very, very respected, loved teacher,” Blodgett said.

The suspect, Philip Chism, was arraigned on a murder charge Wednesday and ordered held without bail. The teenager, described by classmates as soft-spoken and pleasant, also did not come home from school the day before and was spotted walking along Route 1 in the neighboring town of Topsfield at about 12:30 a.m. Wednesday.

Officials didn’t release a cause of death and haven’t discussed a motive in the killing.

A court filing said Ritzer and Chism were known to each other from the high school, but it did not elaborate. The arrest was made based on statements by the suspect and corroborating evidence at multiple scenes, investigators said in court documents.

Ritzer’s family said they are mourning the death of their “amazing, beautiful daughter and sister.”

“Everyone that knew and loved Colleen knew of her passion for teaching and how she mentored each and every one of her students,” the family said in a statement provided by her uncle Dale Webster.

At his arraignment in adult court in Salem, Chism’s defense attorney argued for the proceeding to be closed and her client to be allowed to stay hidden because of his age. The judge denied the request. The lawyer, Denise Regan, declined to comment outside court. No statement had been released from his family by Wednesday evening.

The tall, lanky teenager had moved to Massachusetts from Tennessee before the start of the school year and was a top scorer on the school’s junior varsity soccer team, said Kyle Cahill, a junior who also plays soccer. He said the team had been wondering where Chism was when he skipped a team dinner Tuesday night.

“We’re all just a family. It just amazes me really,” Cahill said. “He wasn’t violent at all. He was really the opposite of aggressive.”

Ritzer had a Twitter account where she gave homework assignments, encouraged students and described herself as a “math teacher often too excited about the topics I’m teaching.”

She was a 2011 graduate of Assumption College in Worcester, a school spokeswoman said Wednesday. She graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in math, a minor in psychology and a secondary education concentration, according to the college’s 2011 commencement program.

One of her former students, Chris Weimert, 17, said she was a warm, welcoming person who would stand outside her classroom and say hello to students she didn’t teach. He said she had been at the school for two years.

“She was the nicest teacher anyone could ever have. She always had a warm smile on her face,” he said.

Ryan Kelleher, a senior, said students related to the young teacher, who liked to wear jeans and UGG boots just like the teenagers she taught. Kelleher, who also plays soccer, said the arrest of the soft-spoken Chism didn’t make sense to him.

“From what I know about him and seeing him every day, it just doesn’t add up that he would do such a thing, unless this was all an act to fool somebody,” the 17-year-old said.

Ritzer lived at home with her 20-year-old brother and her sister, a high school senior. The close-knit family was often outside, barbecuing, spending time together and enjoying each other’s company, neighbors said.

Mary Duffy has lived next door to the Ritzers in the suburban neighborhood in Andover since the family moved there more than two decades ago. She had known Colleen Ritzer from the time she was a baby and said the Ritzers’ oldest child had just one life ambition: to be a high school math teacher.

“All I ever heard is that she loved her job,” Duffy said.

All public schools in Danvers, about 20 miles north of Boston, were closed Wednesday.

The Boston Red Sox had a moment of silence for Ritzer Wednesday before Game 1 of the World Series.

Hundreds turned out for a candlelight vigil Wednesday evening on the parking lot of the school. Many wore pink, Ritzer’s favorite color. They prayed and sang and, at the end of the vigil, they placed their candles along with some stuffed animals in the middle of a ring they have formed for the gathering.

“She supported all of us. We should be there to support her,” said Danvers senior Courtney Arnoldy, 18, who had Ritzer for a teacher.

Ritzer is the second teacher allegedly killed by a student in the U.S. this week. A Sparks, Nev., middle school teacher was allegedly shot by a 12-year-old student on Monday.

___

Associated Press writer Lynne Tuohy in Andover and news researcher Rhonda Shafner in New York City contributed to this report.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/soft-spoken-teen-accused-killing-mass-teacher-184209455.html
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